Family Law Attorney
Playa Vista: (424) 500-2983
Century City: (310) 310-2236
evan@evanbraunsteinlaw.com

evan@evanbraunsteinlaw.com

Filing for Divorce

Understanding Uncontested Divorce and How to Achieve One

Friday, November 2nd, 2018
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce

You may assume that divorces are always messy – that separating couples fight, and that issues in a divorce take the intervention of a judge in order to resolve. However, this is not always the case; in fact, many couples are able to pursue an uncontested divorce, which mitigates high divorce expenses, stress, and hurt feelings. At the Law Offices of Evan Braunstein, our Los Angeles divorce lawyer advocates for uncontested divorce whenever possible. Here’s what you should know–

What Is an Uncontested Divorce?

An uncontested divorce does not refer to a situation in which both parties agree to divorce itself, but rather a situation where both parties are in agreement about the terms of a divorce. This means that both parties agree in regards to how property should be divided, with whom any shared children will live, what the visitation rights of the other parent will be, whether or not alimony will be part of the divorce settlement and any other issues in a divorce.

How to Reach Agreement with Your Spouse

Sometimes, reaching an agreement with your spouse is easy. Indeed, some couples are so cooperative and amicable during the divorce process that by the time they file for divorce, they have already resolved all of the above issues. This situation is ideal, but it’s not common.

Rather, many couples disagree about certain issues in the divorce but are committed to working together in a collaborative, compromising manner to resolve these issues. This is typically done through mediation, where both parties meet together with a third-party mediator – a neutral person who is responsible for facilitating the conversation and helping the couple reach an agreement.

Why an Attorney Is Always Necessary

Even when you and your spouse are in agreement about the terms of a divorce, which means that divorce litigation will not be necessary, it is still strongly recommended that you work with a skilled California divorce lawyer. A lawyer will ensure the following:

  • Legality of the agreement – It is important that the agreement that you and your spouse reach is legal, and that it is put in writing and signed by both.
  • Lack of errors – Even an agreement with the best of intentions can go south if the written document spelling out the terms of the agreement contains errors. You should always have legal documents reviewed by an attorney prior to signing.
  • Protection of your best interests – Accepting any divorce terms simply because you want the affair to be over and done with is not within your best interests. It’s important that you think of your short- and long-term goals and needs as they pertain to your finances and your relationship with your children. An attorney can help you to both identify and protect said goals.

Contact Our California Divorce Lawyer Today

If you are filing for a divorce, whether your divorce is contested or uncontested, we urge you to meet with our California divorce lawyer. At the Law Offices of Evan Braunstein, we fight for you. Call us today to learn more about our legal services during a divorce or send us a message telling us more about your situation.



5 Surprising Facts About Divorce You Should Know

Tuesday, October 16th, 2018
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce

Before you file for a divorce with the help of a Los Angeles divorce lawyer, it’s important to get as much information about the divorce process as possible. Here are five surprising facts about divorce you should know, and if you need more information about divorce that’s specific to your situation, reach out to a qualified divorce lawyer.

Read more of this post.



How to Help Your Children During the Divorce Process

Monday, August 20th, 2018
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce, Legal Separation

When parents in Los Angeles decide to get divorced, the process of dissolving the marriage can be especially difficult for children. A Los Angeles divorce lawyer will tell you that sometimes kids mistakenly believe that they played a role in causing the divorce, while other children and teens simply have trouble coping with the fact that their parents will not be living together any longer or that they will need to spend time at two different homes in order to maintain relationships with both parents. The way a child responds to the divorce process is dependent upon many different factors, such as the child’s age and his or her current relationship with parents and siblings.

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How California Divorce Works Across State Lines

Friday, July 13th, 2018
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce

When you get divorced in Los Angeles, California, laws regarding property division, the establishment of a child support, child custody order, and all other divorce processes are applied to your case. It is possible to divorce your spouse if he or she lives in another state, although it’s best to do so with the help of a Playa Vista divorce lawyer. In many cases where the spouses live in two different states, the couple can choose where they want to file for their divorce, provided both partners meet their state’s residency requirement. After your divorce is finalized, either spouse moving to another state can potentially require the couple to modify one or more of their original divorce orders. Read more of this post.



Preparing For Your Initial Consultation With A Family Law Attorney

Sunday, April 26th, 2009
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce, Finding a Family Law Attorney

I provide a free initial consultation for family law matters. This gives me an opportunity to meet with a potential client, learn about their situation and decide how I can most effectively represent them. I then prepare a detailed representation agreement that describes the specific legal services that I will provide in that particular case along with a fixed fee for those services. In a prior post, I suggested five questions to help you choose a family law attorney. Below are five things to bring with you to an initial consultation to help you and the family law attorney evaluate your case. Read more of this post.



Bifurcation & Bifurcated Divorces In An Economic Downturn

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009
Categories: Blog, Division and Valuation of Property, Filing for Divorce

In a divorce proceeding, bifurcation is the division of the divorce into two or more parts. In California, bifurcation is governed by California Family Law Code Section 2337. There are two types of bifurcation. In the first, the parties bifurcate the divorce by severing the issue of marital status from all other issues to obtain a “status-only divorce.” In the second, the parties bifurcate a single key issue from the rest of the case, and have a mini-trial to resolve that key issue. Both types of bifurcation can be especially useful to people getting divorced in today’s economic downturn.

Bifurcation & Status-Only Divorces

Certain parts of a divorce such as the division and valuation of property, child custody, child support and spousal support can take longer to resolve than we would like. This is equally true whether the parties are negotiating or are preparing for trial. They may bifurcate the issue of marital status and reserve the court’s jurisdiction over all other matters. This can give them the peace of mind knowing that they are divorced, can move on with their lives, and can even remarry, while knowing that they will have the time necessary to properly resolve the other divorce issues.

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Filing For Legal Separation May Help You Get Divorced Faster

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce, Legal Separation

Filing for dissolution of marriage in California requires that one of the parties meets certain residency requirements. Specifically, he or she must have been a resident of the state of California for the last 6 months, and of the particular county where the case is filed for the last 3 months. I wrote about California’s residency requirements for a dissolution of marriage in a previous blog post.

After the petition for dissolution of marriage has been filed with the court and properly served with a summons on the other party, the parties must wait a minimum of 6 months to become divorced. This 6 month waiting period cannot be shortened no matter how simple the matter, how amicable the parties, or how much they want the divorce to be finalized. In many cases, the parties are able to resolve all marital issues including division of property, spousal support, child support, and child custody in less than 6 months and are left counting the days until they can be divorced. Read more of this post.



Separate, Separated, Separation

Friday, February 20th, 2009
Categories: Blog, Child Custody, Division and Valuation of Property, Filing for Divorce, Legal Separation, Spousal Support

Here are three legal terms that you should think about if you are thinking about filing for divorce:

Separate – Separate Property

One part of a divorce is the division of property. California is a community property state. All property obtained by either party during a marriage is presumed to be community property and jointly owned 50/50 unless the acquisition of the property was the result of a gift or inheritance. Any property acquired during a marriage that can be traced to separate property is also separate property. All other property, including property that was acquired before marriage or after the date of separation, is separate property. Certain actions and/or agreements Read more of this post.



Even If You Don’t Live In California You Might Still Be Able To Hire A Los Angeles Divorce Attorney

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009
Categories: Blog, Filing for Divorce, Finding a Family Law Attorney

You can file for divorce in California if you have adequate grounds and meet the residency requirements.

California is a no-fault divorce state. Legally adequate grounds for divorce, under California Family Code Section 2310 are “incurable insanity” and “irreconcilable differences which have caused the irremediable dissolution of the marriage.” Residency for purposes of divorce requires that one party has lived in the state of California for the last 6 months, and in the particular county where the divorce will be filed for the last 3 months.

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